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A Maradona Mini-Lesson

culture expressions slang Nov 26, 2020

If you haven't seen the news, Argentina's iconic and beloved soccer legend, Diego Armando Maradona, has passed. 

Widely regarded as one of the greatest players of all time, Maradona's goal against England in the 86' quarter-finals is one of the most famous in soccer-history and was dubbed 'la mano de Dios' - or the hand of God- as he illicitly scored by hitting the ball with his hand. Such is his status in Argentina that the country's president, Alberto Fernandez, announced three days of national mourning right after his death.

But it wasn't just goals and world cups that were associated with Maradona - he was also a man of many nicknames.

Check out some of his most famous apodos

El Pelusa

Translation: Fluff; fuzz

This nickname dates back to Maradona's childhood days spent in Villa Fiorito, a slum in the outskirts of Buenos Aires. In an interview he stated that he was christened pelusa since, when he was born, he was full of pelos or hairs, that...

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Beer-related frases from across the Spanish-speaking mundo 🍻

#slang expressions Nov 23, 2020

As you probably know, there are toons of different regional variations present in the Spanish language. Something that is said in one Spanish-speaking country could mean something completely different in another region, so if you plan on visiting various lugares it's good to know the different terms and palabras.

Beer -one of the most popular alcoholic beverages in Latin America and Spain- has various associated slang terms. 

These are some of the most popular ways to say cerveza (the generic palabra for in Spanish)

Birra 

Where: Argentina, Spain, Dominican Republic

Ex. ¡Poneme una birra, por favor!

*Fun-fact - comes from Italian

Pola

Where: Colombia

Ex. Para mi una pola y para el un aguardiente.

Chela

Where: Mexico, Ecuador, Peru, Guatemala, Chile

Ex. Mi bebida preferida es la chela.

Fría

Where: Dominican Republic, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Venezuela

Ex. Ponme una fría, bien fría.

Caña

Where: ...

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A Pronunciation Trick That'll Make You Laugh Your A** Off

pronunciation Nov 23, 2020

¡Buenas, buenas!

Hoy, we're bringing you a simple-but-super-effective trick to help you tackle the pronunciation of the verb hacer (to do). We've always found that its easier to remember stuff with mnemonic devices, especially if their funny: 

If we break up 'hacer' into two parts we're left with the sounds 'ass' and 'er'.

So basically, 'ass,' the raunchy word for butt and 'er,' like a stutter.

We can also use this trick for some of hacer's conjugations. Here's a list to refresh your memory:

Hacer

Yo hago

Tu haces

El hace

Nosotros hacemos

Vosotros hacéis

Ellos hacen

With the exception of hago, which we can break up into 'ah' (like a pause) and 'go!' (like advance), all of these conjugations could be ass-related.

Haces - Asses (plural of ass)

Hace - Ass, eh?

Hacemos - Ass, eh +mos

Hacéis - Ass + ace (like an ace of spades)

Hacen - Ass + the letter 'n'

Remember these ass-related tricks and you'll be pronouncing like a native in no...

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¿How to ask questions in Spanish?

grammar Nov 13, 2020

¿Cómo estás? Since life is full of questions, it's important to know how to ask them. That's why today, we're covering how to pose una pregunta in Spanish.

One way to form a question is to switch the verb and the subject and add a question mark at the end, as well as the ¿ at the front of the sentence. When the subject of the verb is specified, you can change the word order so that the verb comes BEFORE the subject.

Statement: Juan quiere ir al parque.
Question: ¿Quiere Juan ir al parque?

But if you want to ask a yes or no question, you're in luck, because it's even easier -  just keep the word order exactly as it would be in a normal sentence but turn it into a question by making your voice go up at the end.

Statement: Vamos a comer.
Question: ¿Vamos a comer?

¿Not too difficult, right?

 We spent years studying people who became fluent in Español and took everything we learned to create Visual Spanish.

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Learn Spanish with Juanes

music video vocab Nov 13, 2020
 

Juanes, born Juan Estebán Aristizábal Vásquez (¡what a name!) is a Colombian guitarist, singer, songwriter and certified heart-throb. One of Latin America's most influential artists of the 21st Century, we can use his song Gotas de agua dulce to learn about some natural elements.

Some definitions:
Gotas - Drops
Agua - Water
Rayo de sol - Ray of sun
Luz - Light
Sombra - Shade

In this song, Juanes uses various elements figuratively to express his #Deep emotions and make romantic metaphors. When we contextualize the definitions, it becomes a lot easier to understand their significance.

Lo que yo siento por ti es amor
Ganas que me hacen útil el corazón
droga que me hace inmune ante el dolor
gotas de agua dulce rayo de sol.

Llévame, de ser preciso, por la semblanza de tu sombra
yo sé que tu prendes la luz y en mi vida te asomas
como las blancas palomas, cuando la plaza se toman
con vuelo inmortal.

...

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Learn the Various Meanings of Río in Spanish

grammar vocab Nov 12, 2020
 

In Spanish, verb to laugh, reírse, can get confusing. Reír is a reflexive verb, meaning its used with a reflexive pronoun. Considering that río, the word for river, is the same as the yo conjugation of reír, it can be easy to misuse the two.

Since its easy to confuse the different forms of rio, it's important to have these conjugations down:

Yo me río
Tu te ríes
El se ríe
Nosotros nos reímos
Vosotros os reís
Ellos se ríen

Keep practicing and know that you know your stuff by using the phrase:

Yo me río por que ella se cayo en el río.

If you want to try a Spanish course that is fun and will keep you laughing - and learning - try Visual Spanish. Speak Conversational Spanish in 5 Weeks.

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Use a Mariachi Song to Learn Mexican Slang 🇲🇽🎶

music video slang Nov 11, 2020
 

In Mexico, a popular way to say ok or 'adelante' is the slang word arre. It's etymological meaning is super interesting and makes a lot of sense when you contextualize it. And lucky for us, we can use mariachi legend José Alfredo Jiménez's famous song El rey as a way to remember its significance:

Arre comes from the word arriero, or muleteer, who has the job of steering forward mules. When you think of arre then, it makes sense that these words are connected.

José Alfredo's mariachi talks about solitude but also perseverance and in the lyrics, he mentions that on his journey, he speaks to an arriero, or a muleteer, who inspires him to go forth but without pressure when he says:

Después me dijo un arriero
que no hay que llegar primero,
pero hay que saber llegar.

Translation:
After, a muleteer told me
you don't have to get there first
but you have to know how to get there.

If you ever forget the meaning of arre, use...

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Fart-Related Phrases to Help You Speak Like a True Argentine

expressions slang Nov 11, 2020

In Spain, a lot of expressions include the word ‘milk.’ In Mexico, many phrases seem to feature 'madre' the term for mom. Well in Argentina, the key word is (drumroll please...)  pedo, or fart  

Check these farty-phrases out:

'De pedo'
Literal translation: 'Of the fart' (Meaning: Luck)
Example: Llegué de pedo, había mucho tráfico.

'En pedo'
Literal translation: 'In a fart' (Meaning: To be drunk)
Example: Llegué a casa en pedo porque tomé mucha tequila.

'Ni en pedo'
Literal translation: 'Not in a fart' (Meaning: Hell no)
Example: Ni en pedo pienso compartir mi postre.

'Al pedo'
Literal translation: 'At fart' (Meaning: Bored)
Example: Estamos mucho tiempo al pedo en cuarentena.

'A los pedos'
Literal translation: 'At the farts' (Meaning: Very fast)
Example: Fui a los pedos porque no quería llegar tarde.

'¿Estás en pedo?'
Literal translation: 'Are you in a fart?' (Meaning: Are you kidding me?)
Example: ...

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5 Ways to Figuratively Sh*t on Something in Spanish

expressions slang Nov 11, 2020

Ever thought of how we have a ton of phrases in English that feature the word a**? A**hole, jacka**, kiss my a**, kicka**... The list goes on and on. Well the same is true for the Spanish word cagar (the equivalent of sh*t in English). While these may not be the most elegant of phrases, they'll definitely come in handy once in a while.

Learn a couple of them here:

Me cago en tus muertos
Translation: I sh*t on your ancestors

Me cago en la leche
Translation: I sh*t on the milk

Me cago en todo
Translation: I sh*t on literally everything

Me cago en la madre que te parió
Translation: I sh*t on the mother who birthed you

Me cago en tu puta madre
Translation: I sh*t on your prostitute of a mother

Visual Spanish teaches you real Español - Not the stuff you learn in outdated textbooks or repetitive apps - the language that Spanish-speakers use to communicate every single day.

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Different Ways to Express Being Hungover in Spanish 🌎🍸🍹🍻

expressions slang Nov 11, 2020

Since Spanish is spoken in so many places across the world, many countries have different ways of expressing a particular word or concept. This happens to be the case with the word hangover, otherwise known as that atrocious feeling you get after drinking too much. 

Check out these diverse phrases:

Resaca -

Resaca is the most general and popular way to say hangover in Spanish and most Spanish-speakers will know what you mean when you say it.

Forms of usage:
Tener + resaca 
Example: Tengo mucha resaca. 
Estar + resaca
Example: Estoy de resaca.

Guayabo -

Guayabo translates to guava tree, but in Colombia (and only in Colombia) it also means to have a hangover. If you drink too much aguardiente, Colombia’s famous liquor, chances are you’ll have to integrate this word into your vocabulary.

Forms of usage:
Tener + guayabo 
Example: Tengo un guayabo tremendo. 
Estar + enguayabado 
Example: ...

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